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Rise & Shine: No charge for Denver school board president following complaint about poking

Good morning!

Nearly five years ago, two of my colleagues wrote a richly detailed and heart-wrenching series about Denver's Manual High School. At the time, it was the lowest-performing high school in the city, facing the first year on the state's "accountability clock." Today, it's still on the clock — and has just one more chance to improve or face state intervention. But, as Melanie Asmar writes, Manual faces significant hurdles in its bid for progress, not least of all that its last principal resigned in March and the district hasn't yet found a permanent replacement.

Also in today's roundup, we have stories on the heated debate that has characterized Denver's search for a new superintendent and a fascinating New York Times piece — by Chalkbeat's New York Bureau Chief Sara Mosle — about how one struggling elementary school helped teachers get better at their craft.

— Ann Schimke, senior reporter

 


Rise & Shine is Chalkbeat’s morning digest of education news. Subscribe to have it delivered to your inbox, or forward to a friend who cares about public education.


NO CHARGE The Denver district attorney’s office is not filing charges against the Denver school board president following a complaint from a vocal district critic that she poked him in the chest. Chalkbeat

ON THE CLOCK Denver’s storied but academically struggling Manual High School faces the possibility of state intervention next school year after earning five consecutive low ratings from the Colorado Department of Education. Chalkbeat

DIVISION As Denver Public Schools searches for a new superintendent to replace departing Tom Boasberg, the issue of charter schools figures prominently in the debate. 9News

WHAT’S THE IMPACT? An 18-year-old Colorado resident gets answers about whether teacher protests last spring resulted in any changes to teacher pay or the state’s retirement system. CPR

FINALIST Katie Goldsberry, a fifth grade teacher at Longmont Estates Elementary in the St. Vrain Valley district, is one of six finalists for 2019 Colorado Teacher of the Year. Times-Call

TEACHING GOOD TEACHING An in-depth look at how the principal of one struggling Atlanta elementary school tried to help her teachers improve. New York Times