showdown

Cuomo pans Regents' Common Core plan as "too little, too late"

New York State capitol

ALBANY — It didn’t take long for Gov. Andrew Cuomo to fire back at the latest change to his signature teacher evaluation policy.

As part of a plan to improve the rollout of the Common Core standards, the state Board of Regents today approved a new regulation that would make it easier for teachers who receive low ratings to defend themselves.

The Regents’ plan was seen as a moderate alternative to the two-year delay on tying test scores to teacher evaluations that leading lawmakers called for last week. But while Cuomo gently dismissed that proposal, he issued a harsh statement today that questioned the very existence of the state policy-making body.

“Today’s recommendations are another in a series of missteps by the Board of Regents that suggests the time has come to seriously reexamine its capacity and performance,” Cuomo said in the statement. “These recommendations are simply too little, too late for our parents and students.”

The scathing statement, nearly 200 words long, caught officials at the State Education Department building across the street by surprise. It was sent out just moments after Commissioner John King and Chancellor Merryl Tisch completed a conference call with reporters and hurried off to another meeting. They were not immediately available to respond.

During the call, Tisch praised Cuomo’s support. “There is no question that the governor has been an enormous ally in this implementation and in the rollout of evaluation,” she said.

Cuomo seems to have taken particular offense to changes to teacher evaluation policies. The Regents approved a new regulation that would make it easier for teachers brought up on termination charges by their district after receiving two straight years of ‘ineffective’ ratings to defend themselves. Teachers would be allowed to cite their districts’ failure to support teachers as the teachers worked to prepare students to meet the Common Core standards as evidence in their defense during termination proceedings.

“The Regents’ response is to recommend delaying the teacher evaluation system and is yet another in a long series of roadblocks to a much needed evaluation system which the Regents had stalled putting in place for years,” Cuomo said.

The strident statement shows just how protective Cuomo is of New York’s teacher evaluation law, which has been a core education accomplishment during his first term as governor. Cuomo has negotiated several changes to the law to push the law into effect, in the process taking on both unions and school districts that were slow to implement their plans.

John Flanagan, chair of the State Senate’s education committee, took a softer tone, saying that the Regents’ plan addressed many of his concerns about the Common Core rollout.

The education advocacy organization StudentsFirstNY, which is closely aligned to Cuomo, broadly criticized the Regents for catering too much to the state teachers union. It suggested that the union was pressuring some Regents members whose tenure is up for reappointment this year.

“By threatening to oust incumbent Regents and rile up stakeholders, the teachers union and their allies are forcing the Regents to tamper with the state’s new evaluation system, which was enacted with the full consent of the union,” said StudentsFirstNY Executive Director Jenny Sedlis.

In an interview, Maria Neira, vice president of the New York State United Teachers, said the report did not go far enough for the union.

“We’re going to continue to lobby our legislators because we do need a moratorium,” said Neira, referring to legislators’ request to detach Common Core test scores from teacher evaluations. “I didn’t hear that said. What I heard was the opposite.”

Betty Rosa and Kathy Cashin, two Regents representing New York City, voted against the slate of changes, arguing that they did not go far enough to address concerns.

Top teacher

Franklin educator is Tennessee’s 2018-19 Teacher of the Year

PHOTO: TDOE
Melissa Miller leads her students in a learning game at Franklin Elementary School in Franklin Special School District in Williamson County. Miller is Tennessee's 2018-19 Teacher of the Year.

A first-grade teacher in Franklin is Tennessee’s Teacher of the Year.

Melissa Miller

Melissa Miller, who works at Franklin Elementary School, received the 2018-19 honor for excellence in the classroom Thursday evening during a banquet in Nashville.

A teacher for 19 years, she is National Board Certified, serves as a team leader and mentor at her school, and trains her colleagues on curriculum and technology in Franklin’s city school district in Williamson County, just south of Nashville. She will represent Tennessee in national competition and serve on several working groups with the state education department.

Miller was one of nine finalists statewide for the award, which has been presented to a Tennessee public school teacher most every year since 1960 as a way to promote respect and appreciation for the profession. The finalists were chosen based on scoring from a panel of educators; three regional winners were narrowed down following interviews.

In addition to Miller, who also won in Middle Tennessee, the state recognized Lori Farley, a media specialist at North City Elementary School in Athens City Schools, in East Tennessee. Michael Robinson, a high school social studies teacher at Houston High School in Germantown Municipal School District, was this year’s top teacher in West Tennessee.

Education Commissioner Candice McQueen praised the finalists for leading their students to impressive academic gains and growth. She noted that “teachers are the single most important factor in improving students’ achievement.”

Last year’s statewide winner was Cicely Woodard, an eighth-grade math teacher in Nashville who has since moved to a middle school in the same Franklin district as Miller.

You can learn more about Tennessee’s Teacher of the Year program here.

PSA

Have you thought about teaching? Colorado teachers union sells the profession in new videos

PHOTO: Colorado Education Association

There are a lot of factors contributing to a shortage of teachers in Colorado and around the nation. One of them — with potentially long-term consequences — is that far fewer people are enrolling in or graduating from teacher preparation programs. A recent poll found that more than half of respondents, citing low pay and lack of respect, would not want their children to become teachers.

Earlier this year, one middle school teacher told Chalkbeat the state should invest in public service announcements to promote the profession.

“We could use some resources in Colorado to highlight how attractive teaching is, for the intangibles,” said Mary Hulac, who teaches English in the Greeley-Evans district. “I tell my students every day, this is the best job.

“You learn every day as a teacher. I’m a language arts teacher. When we talk about themes, and I hear a story through another student’s perspective, it’s always exciting and new.”

The Colorado Education Association, the state’s largest teachers union, has brought some resources to help get that message out with a series of videos aimed at “up-and-coming professionals deciding on a career.” A spokesman declined to say how much the union was putting into the ad buy.

The theme of the ads is: “Change a life. Change the world.”

“Nowhere but in the education profession can a person have such a profound impact on the lives of students,” association President Amie Baca-Oehlert said in a press release. “We want to show that teaching is a wonderful and noble profession.”

As the union notes, “Opportunities to teach in Colorado are abundant.”

One of the ads features 2018 Colorado Teacher of the Year Christina Randle.

“Are you ready to be a positive role model for kids and have a direct impact on the future?” Randle asks.

Another features an education student who was inspired by her own teachers and a 20-year veteran talking about how much she loves her job.

How would you sell the teaching profession to someone considering their career options? Let us know at [email protected].