Big money

Senate releases budget plan, weighing in on school funding saga and rejecting Cuomo’s ‘Excelsior Scholarship’ proposal

PHOTO: Creative Commons, courtesy JasonParis

As state lawmakers approach the budget deadline of April 1, the three big proposals are now on the table.

The Senate passed a budget proposal on Wednesday that includes a new vision for college affordability, a different take on school funding, and more support for charter schools. Now that the Senate, Assembly and governor’s proposals are public, the three will begin hammering out a final budget deal.

Here are some of the education proposals championed by the Senate:

— The Senate education proposal increases total school aid by $1.2 billion. That’s more than the $1 billion increase that the governor proposed, but less than the Board of Regents ($2.1 billion) or the Assembly ($1.8 billion) requested.

The Senate also addresses “foundation aid” — school funding that is distributed through a formula based on need. The formula was created in response to a 2006 settlement in response to the Campaign for Fiscal Equity lawsuit, which found state funding levels were not always sufficient to provide a sound basic education.

It has generated extra controversy this year after Governor Andrew Cuomo proposed not fully phasing in the formula, a move some advocates described as a “repeal” of the agreement. Instead of picking sides, the Senate opted for a new way to allocate funds.

The Senate proposes providing more foundation aid than the governor, but divvying up that money among new funding streams. Funds would be specifically earmarked for New York City, community schools, small cities and rural districts among other entities, according to Billy Easton, executive director of the Alliance for Quality Education, an advocacy organization that has long fought for increased school funding.

Easton says from his initial read of the proposal, this new formula would result in less funding for New York City than under the current formula.

“The goal is to drive money away from New York City and other high-needs school districts,” Easton said.

— The Senate rejects the governor’s “Excelsior Scholarship” — a plan that provides free tuition at SUNY and CUNY schools to families making less than $125,000 per year — but provides a college affordability plan of its own.

Its plan invests in the state’s existing Tuition Assistance Program, which can be used at both public and private colleges. The governor’s plan has been criticized for disadvantaging private colleges.

The benefits of the Senate’s plan would fall mostly on middle- and upper middle-income families, said Kevin Stump, Northeast regional director for Young Invincibles, a group that encourages young adult activism on a range of issues. Families earning about $50,000 to $125,000 would benefit the most, while some lower-income students would see an increase of a few hundred dollars per year, he said. As with the governor’s plan, the money comes with strings attached. In this case, he said, it includes a requirement that students take 30 credits each year and meet GPA standards.

— To nobody’s surprise, the Senate’s budget provides strong support for charter schools. It carries over the perks in the governor’s executive budget, including lifting the charter school cap in New York City, unfreezing the charter school tuition formula and providing additional funding to New York City charter schools moving into private space.

But the Senate goes further than the governor in its backing of charter schools. It calls for lifting the charter school cap statewide, providing building aid statewide, and increasing funding so schools can cover the expenses of support staff, like nurses or security guards, said Greg Berck, assistant director of government relations at the Council of School Superintendents.

“Members of the New York State Senate … have once again shown their incredible commitment to charter school families,” said Northeast Charter Schools Network New York State Director Andrea Rogers. “We are grateful for this bipartisan coalition of senators who understand the importance of investing in charter schools that are working and respecting the choices of the families that choose them.”

meet the candidates

These candidates are running for Detroit school board. Watch them introduce themselves.

Nine candidates are vying for two seats on Detroit's school board in November. Seven submitted photos.

One candidate tells of a childhood in a house without heat.

Another describes the two-hour commute he made to high school every day to build a future that would one day enable him to give back to Detroit.

A third says her work as a student activist inspired her to run for school board as a recent high school grad.

These candidates are among nine people vying for two seats up for grabs on Detroit’s seven-member school board on Nov. 6. That includes one incumbent and many graduates of the district.

Chalkbeat is partnering with Citizen Detroit to present a school board candidate forum Thursday, Sept. 20 from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at IBEW Local 58, 1358 Abbott St., Detroit.

Participants will have the opportunity to meet each candidate and ask questions in a speed-dating format.

In anticipation of that event, Citizen Detroit invited each of the candidates to make a short video introducing themselves to voters. Seven candidates made videos.

Watch them here:

School safety

Report lists litany of failings over police in Chicago schools

PHOTO: Scott Olson/Getty Images
Police officers stand alongside Lake Shore Drive in August as protesters decry violence and lack of investment in African-American neighborhoods and schools

The Chicago Police Department doesn’t adequately screen and train the officers it assigns to Chicago Public Schools, and their roles in schools are poorly defined, according to a sharply critical report released today by the Office of Inspector General Joseph Ferguson.

The report lists a litany of failings, including basic administration: There is no current agreement between the police department and the district governing the deployment of school resource officers, or SROs, and neither the schools nor the police even have a current list of the officers working in schools this year.

The inspector general’s report also mentions several sets of SRO resources and best practices created and endorsed by the federal government, then notes that Chicago hasn’t adopted any of them. “CPD’s current lack of guidance and structure for SROs amplifies community concerns and underscores the high probability that students are unnecessarily becoming involved in the criminal justice system, despite the availability of alternate solutions,” says the report.

Chalkbeat reported in August about incidents in which SROs used batons and tasers on students while intervening in routine disciplinary matters.

Scrutiny of SROs is nothing new, and is part of the broader CPD consent decree brokered this week between Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan. That agreement calls for better training and vetting of SROs, as well as a clearer delineation of their roles on campuses—including a prohibition against participating in routine school discipline — beginning with the 2019-20 school year.

Read more: How the police consent decree could impact Chicago schools

But the report from Ferguson’s office says that the consent decree doesn’t go far enough. It chastises police for not pledging to include the community in the creation of its agreement with the school district, nor in the establishment of hiring guidelines; and for not creating a plan for evaluating SROs’ performance, among other recommendations. In addition, the report criticizes the police department for delaying the reforms until the 2019-20 school year. A draft of the inspector general’s report was given to the police department in early August in hopes that some of the issues could be resolved in time for the school year that began last week. The police department asked for an extension for its reply.