3-K for All

Coming to a district near you: As city expands pre-K for 3-year-olds, Mayor de Blasio urges families to sign up

PHOTO: Christina Veiga
Applications open Monday for 3-K for All, the city's free preschool program for 3-year-olds.

Riding the heels of an announcement that New York City will move more quickly to make free preschool available to all 3-year-olds, Mayor Bill de Blasio on Friday visited a “3-K for All” classroom to encourage parents to sign up for the program.

Applications open Monday for 3-K sites in the four districts that currently offer the program. Those are District 7 in the South Bronx and District 23 in Brooklyn, which opened last year; and District 4 in Manhattan and District 27 in Queens, which are new this year.

This week, the mayor announced the city would expand 3-K ahead of schedule in four additional school districts. The $46 million expansion will begin in April, when applications open for District 5 in Harlem Manhattan and District 16 in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.

The program builds on the mayor’s signature education achievement, free pre-K for all 4-year-olds. De Blasio has called early childhood education a game changer for families, who save money on childcare, and an educational boost for students who might otherwise stay at home.

We’ve really devoted ourselves in the next four years to creating a city that becomes more and more fair for everyone,” de Blasio said Friday, when he visited a bustling 3-K classroom at P.S./I.S. 323 in Brownsville. “This is one of the most basic ways we can do that – that every 3-year-old get the same strong start, and that it is universal, and it is free.”

During the mayor’s visit, 3-K teacher Carine Bruny said her students would be “pros” by the time it came to start kindergarten. As they stacked blocks and cooked imaginary meals in the classroom kitchen Friday, they were also learning how to work together, Bruny said.

Throughout the day, she encourages her young students to share what they’ve done and how they feel.

“They are expanding their language skills from one-word responses — or no response at all — to sentences,” she said.

While the city was able to launch the program for 4-year-olds, dubbed Pre-K for All, at lightning speed, it will take longer to extend free preschool to younger students. Constrained by space and funding, the city has started offering 3-K in mostly high-needs districts — though de Blasio says he hopes to make it available across the city.

The programs are open to families regardless of where they live, but some give priority to those who live in the district.

By next year, city officials expect to serve 5,000 3-K students. They hope to make it available across the city by 2021, with spots for more than 60,000 3-year-olds.

But, with an estimated price tag of more than $1 billion, that will require an influx of about $700 million from outside sources at a time when the city faces budget threats from both Washington, D.C. and Albany.

Immigration fears

Chicago on Trump administration changes: ‘A sicker, poorer and less secure community’

PHOTO: Scott Olson/Getty Images
A scene from an August immigration rally in downtown Chicago. Mayor Rahm Emanuel submitted a public comment on the proposed public charge rule changes on Monday.

The possibility of tougher rules on immigration and citizenship has provoked “tremendous fear” and plummeting participation in publicly funded daycare programs and afterschool care, according to a federal memorandum the City of Chicago submitted Monday.

The Trump administration has proposed changes that would weigh participation in programs such as Medicaid, food stamps, or housing assistance when granting residency and citizenship.

The changes could be devastating, the Chicago memorandum warns.

They could affect 110,000 Chicago residents, according to the filing. One in three Chicago residents receives Medicaid benefits, which the proposed changes would affect.

Chicago and New York led a coalition of 30 cities that filed comments to the Department of Homeland Security over changes to the so-called “public charge” rule, which is used by immigration officials to decide who is allowed entry and permanent residency in the United States.

“History teaches that, given this choice, many immigrants will choose to forgo public aid, which will make them a sicker, poorer, and less secure community,” according to the City of Chicago’s comments. You can read the entire document below.

Already, the city said, a group called Gads Hill that operates child care centers in Pilsen and North Lawndale has struggled to enroll children because of families’ worries about the impending rules.

Another operator, Shining Star Youth and Community Services in South Chicago, saw families start to keep children home since the proposed changes were announced.

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago told the city that participation in its after-school programming also has taken a hit, the filing said.

The changes to the proposed rule do not specifically mention Head Start or any of the publicly funded child care programs. But many families are fearful that participation in anything offered by the government — from child care to health care to even food programs — would bring them to the attention of immigration authorities.

Early childhood advocates shared similar concerns at a November meeting of the Early Learning Council, an influential group of policymakers who help set the state agenda for children ages birth to 5.

“Families are very confused about the changes,” Rocio Velazquez-Kato, an immigration policy analyst with the Latino Policy Forum, told the group. “They think that by enrolling in Head start or free and reduced-price lunch at school — that it will factor against them.”

Public comment on the proposed rule change was due Monday. The 60-day public comment period is required by law before the federal government delivers a final recommendation.



Literacy tutors needed

Detroit enlists volunteer tutors before third-grade reading law takes effect

PHOTO: Anthony Lanzilote

Detroit’s school district is asking the community for help getting students reading at grade level. The superintendent is hoping volunteer literacy tutors will prevent a critical mass of third-graders from being held back under the state’s tough new reading law.

“We need your help,” Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said, making an appeal for volunteers during a school board meeting Tuesday night. “Our teachers and our principals and our schools alone will not be able to ensure that every student is at third-grade level without your help.”

Which is why the district is working with two community advocacy groups, Keep the Vote/No Takeover and the National Action Network, to launch the Let’s Read program, geared to K-3 students. The program is slated to begin in February — less than a year before the reading law takes effect. Once it does, during the 2019-2019 school year, Michigan third-graders who aren’t reading at grade level will be held back.

In the Detroit district, where proficiency levels on state exams are extremely low, the consequences could be dire. During a community forum last week, Vitti said that the law could hold back as many as 90% of Detroit third-graders, though Michigan’s education department has yet to define what it means for a student to be reading at grade level. At the forum, though, he noted exemptions from the law for such as students with special education needs and those who speak little to no English.

The Let’s Read volunteers will be assigned to individual students based on need. They will read with the children and help them with book selections.

Helen Moore, a longtime community activist who represents the two community organizations behind the volunteer effort, urged people to sign up during the public comment period of the meeting.

“I know our students will succeed, because they’re brilliant,” Moore said. But they and their parents need help, she said.

Vitti said the volunteer cohort is one of many literacy-building efforts underway. In addition, he said that every district school will hold family literacy nights and that its Parent Academy will expand its classes that teach parents how to help their children with reading. A community-wide event to teach Detroiters about the reading law — and what they can do to help — will also be held.

Moore said the word is starting to get out about the Let’s Read program, noting: “The telephone has been ringing like crazy. And now the suburban districts want to be part of it.”

The focus, though, is on Detroit, she said.

Want to volunteer: You can fill out a form here, or call 313-873-7884.