charter compact

Memphis plan looks at thorny challenges of school district sharing buildings with charter operators

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
Freedom Preparatory Academy's high school is housed in the former Lakeview Elementary School owned by Shelby County Schools.

A proposed guideline for charter operators’ use of buildings owned by Shelby County Schools just scratches the surface toward addressing one of the most costly aspects of running a charter school.

The school system’s Charter Advisory Committee wants the criteria for charter access to start with student achievement and alignment with district priorities.

But the panel’s recommendations don’t touch on shared services for building maintenance and how the district prioritizes capital funds, an issue that emerged this year when a leaky roof impacted students in Libertas School of Memphis, a state-run charter school housed in a district-run building in Frayser.

The school board is scheduled to vote Tuesday night on the Charter Advisory Committee’s recommendations that also include proposals to levy a management fee on charter operators and to establish a process for revoking charters from operators who aren’t meeting minimum expectations.

Navigating facilities issues are among the thorniest challenges for stakeholders in need of ground rules for Memphis’ growing charter sector. About a fourth of Shelby County Schools are now charter schools, and the district also is the landlord to some charter operators in the state-run Achievement School District.

At last week’s work session, several school board members said the proposed guidelines aren’t specific enough. And Rodney Moore, the district’s general counsel and chief legal officer, voiced “serious concerns” about the legality of some, though he didn’t offer specifics.

But Chairman Chris Caldwell said the board should treat the proposed guidelines as guiding principles.

“These would not be binding, but they certainly would be serious considerations we can go and incorporate in our final product and reflect on,” Caldwell said. “But I think that too much hard work has been done, too much good work has been done, to do anything that would stall this effort.”

State law does not provide specifics in working with charter operators on facilities but does require local districts to make available “underutilized and vacant properties” without disrupting a district’s plan for the property.

The facilities proposal is mostly based on a policy in Denver, which considers a charter operators’ past academic performance, student enrollment, and the district’s overall facility planning when approving or denying an operator’s request to use district buildings.

Since the district does not have a formal mechanism to establish such priorities, the proposal calls for the creation of an assessment to show what academic needs are prevalent in different parts of the city. The assessment would help rank which charter schools should have access to district buildings based on the building condition, expected building utilization rate, school performance, program needs and parent demand.


Aurora’s superintendent will get a contract extension

Aurora Public Schools Superintendent Rico Munn. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)

The Aurora school board is offering superintendent Rico Munn a contract extension.

Marques Ivey, the school board president, made the announcement during Tuesday’s regular board meeting.

“The board of education believes we are headed in the right direction,” Ivey said. Munn can keep the district going in the right direction, he added.

The contract extension has not been approved yet. Munn said Tuesday night that it had been sent to his lawyer, but he had not had time to review it.

Munn took the leadership position in Aurora Public Schools in 2013. His current contract is set to expire at the end of June.

Munn indicated he intends to sign the new contract after he has time to review it. If he does so, district leaders expect the contract to be on the agenda of the board’s next meeting, April 3, for a first review, and then for a vote at the following meeting.

Details about the new offer, including the length of the extension or any salary increases, have not been made public.

Four of the seven members currently on the board were elected in November as part of a union-supported slate. Many voiced disapproval of some of the superintendent’s reform strategies such as his invitation to charter school network DSST to open in Aurora.

In their first major vote as a new board, the board also voted against the superintendent’s recommendation for the turnaround of an elementary school, signaling a disagreement with the district’s turnaround strategies.

But while several Aurora schools remain low performing, last year the district earned a high enough rating from the state to avoid a path toward state action.

cooling off

New York City charter leader Eva Moskowitz says Betsy DeVos is not ‘ready for prime time’

PHOTO: Chalkbeat
Success Academy CEO and founder Eva Moskowitz seemed to be cooling her support for U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

In New York City, Eva Moskowitz has been a lone voice of support for the controversial U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. But even Moskowitz appears to be cooling on the secretary following an embarrassing interview.

“I believe her heart is in the right place,” Moskowitz, founder and CEO of Success Academy, said of DeVos at an unrelated press conference. “But as the recent interviews indicate, I don’t believe she’s ready for primetime in terms of answering all of the complex questions that need to be answered on the topic of public education and choice.”

That is an apparent reference to DeVos’s roundly criticized appearance on 60 Minutes, which recently aired a 30-minute segment in which the secretary admits she hasn’t visited struggling schools in her tenure. Even advocates of school choice, DeVos’s signature issue, called her performance an “embarrassment,” and “Saturday Night Live” poked fun at her.  

Moskowitz’s comments are an about-face from when the education secretary was first appointed. While the rest of the New York City charter school community was mostly quiet after DeVos was tapped for the position, Moskowitz was the exception, tweeting that she was “thrilled.” She doubled-down on her support months later in an interview with Chalkbeat.

“I believe that education reform has to be a bipartisan issue,” she said.

During Monday’s press conference, which Success Academy officials called to push the city for more space for its growing network, Moskowitz also denied rumors, fueled by a tweet from AFT President Randi Weingarten, that Success officials had recently met with members of the Trump administration.

Shortly after the election, Moskowitz met with Trump amid speculation she was being considered for the education secretary position. This time around, she said it was “untrue” that any visits had taken place.

“You all know that a while back, I was asked to meet with the president-elect. I thought it was important to take his call,” she said. “I was troubled at the time by the Trump administration. I’m even more troubled now. And so, there has been no such meeting.”